JMS Hockey Blog

JMS is a pickup hockey league

Category: Uncategorized

Fall Recruiting Push

by barbaragarn

​You asked, we listened: there are LOTS of new sessions and locations this fall, starting with the many offerings on Friday, September 16. Now let’s get players to fill those roster spots! 

We have new games in Apple Valley and in St. Paul. And Level 1 returns in early October; Level 5 starts on September 20. We begin our adventure in Vadnais Heights in early November and add Maple Grove in early October. Polar is back in the rotation in November, as well as a Tuesday skate at Eden Prairie. And Minnehaha Academy opens in October, where we’ll have Wednesday and Sunday night games. 

For everyone who said, “Why don’t you have ice (on this night/at this rink/at this level)?” — here are your games! Please help us recruit skaters to keep these sessions strong for you. 

Who can you tell about JMS?  

  • friends,
  • family, 
  • teammates, 
  • neighbors,
  • other youth hockey parents, 
  • people at the hockey store, 
  • fans next to you at the Wild game, 
  • people you argue with on NHL blogs, 
  • people playing pick-up at the park,
  • teammates from your other sport,
  • people at Open Skate,
  • your cat (like he cares, right?)


We already have flyers at many area rinks–you can check your local rink for JMS signage and let me know if there’s none on display. (Thanks for your help–I would rather stay home and answer your e-mails instead of driving to 40 rinks in the Twin Cities area!)

In addition to the arena display flyers, I am hoping to have brochures and handouts to distribute at hockey stores and at hockey events. 

Do you know of a place JMS should ask to display brochures? I can think of some stores: Westwood, Boehm’s… that place on Highway 55 past Plymouth. The Goalcrease in Edina. 

I am also looking for hockey events where we can pass out small handouts about JMS. The Let’s Play Hockey expo is way off in March… do you know of any upcoming hockey events where people would want to hear about JMS?

We are going to have a fabulous season. Thank you for helping JMS grow and offer more hockey opportunities!

Barbara Garn
General Manager

Knee Bend Is King

by barbaragarn

​From Andy Blaylock of Competitive Edge (located at Hat Trick Hockey in St. Louis Park)

In the previous segment of Hockey Skating and Physics, we looked at a skating technique adjustment that led to more speed, a slightly shorter stride length, and a greater stride rate.  While extolling the virtues of this adjustment we knocked stride length off of its metaphorical pedestal as the key metric in excellent skating technique.  While, the rumors of stride length’s demise may have been greatly exaggerated (as stride length is still a hugely important concept that skaters should value in many ways), dethroning it does leave room for the true king of hockey skating concepts.  All hail knee bend!  Long live the king.
 
Readers of last week’s article would remember discussion about how, in the forward stride, forward horizontal force production is what it all boils down to.  Wouldn’t that make that the king?  It would… if we were looking to focus on the result that we are trying to produce.  But, what we are talking about here is a question of how we can generate that result (how we can produce maximum forward horizontal force).  Knee bend is the single most important variable that helps us achieve that goal.  And knee bend is so important, it makes the abbreviated recovery strategy from the previous “Hockey Skating and Physics” segment seem downright trivial.   
 
Increased knee bend has an effect on two key stride metrics which lead to speed.  This dual effect is what makes deep knee bend such an important component of the high-performance skating stride.  We will delve into both the increased extension length and flatter extension force direction that deeper knee bend leads to. 
 
To understand extension length, it helps to use the skater’s body as a reference point from which to take our measurements.   
 
When we measure stride length we are talking about the distance down the ice that a player moves during each stride.  To take this measurement, it requires us to use the rink to establish a baseline from which we take our measurements.  In other words we are measuring relative to the rink.  But using this, it is hard to learn much about the effects of knee bend.  For that we should use the skater’s body as the central point that we measure from even though the skater would be moving around the rink.
 
Using a perspective that treats the body as stationary, we can talk about extension length in the simplest terms.   Extension length is the distance along the skating surface that the player pushes the skate away from the body.  At the beginning of this extension, the skater’s leg is at a maximally bent position and his skate is very nearly underneath the body.  At the end of extension, the leg is (ideally) straight and the skate is out away from the body.  In between, as the skate moves away from the body during extension, the skater’s muscles are applying the propulsive force that we so covet to push the body forward.  Extension is the part of the stride where we push ourselves forward so it stands to reason that more extension length would lead to more force and more speed. 
 
What does deeper knee bend mean for extension length?  
 
Imagine a person standing straight up with both knees locked straight.  How far to the side along the ground can that person reach with one leg with all of their weight on the other leg and neither knee bent?  If you don’t allow the pointing of the toe, the answer is zero distance.  The only place that foot can touch the ground would be right next to the other foot because with both legs straight, bringing one leg to the side means you can no longer touch the ground with that foot.  This ultimately means that with zero knee bend you can achieve zero extension length.
 
Now, if we allow the knee to bend on the support leg and then reach out to the side with the other leg, how far out can we tap the ground with the leg that is reaching out?  We assume that the leg that is reaching out is locked straight as this gives the maximum outward reach.  Now the answer is, “it depends”.  You may ask, “it depends on what?”.
 
It depends on the height of the hips.  The closer the hips are to the ground, the further out along the ground the foot on the extended leg reaches.  This spot along the ground where the foot touches is the point of maximum extension and the bigger that maximum the greater extension length we can have.  So one huge benefit of greater knee bend (and the lowering of the hip joints that it creates) is an increased extension length.
Flattening our Extension Force  
 
When we flatten something, one way to define that is to say that we minimize the difference in height from its highest point to its lowest point.  Our extension force by nature will always have a vertical component and a horizontal component to it.  This means that it is directed upwards at an angle.  To flatten this force would be to diminish the vertical component and increase the horizontal, or get it closer to the horizontal.  Greater knee bend accomplishes this for us.  Lets look at how it does this.
 
As we extend our leg and produce force to drive ourselves forward, our leg straightens out (which is obvious).  This results in a force that is on a line starting at the point where our skate blade edge interfaces with the ice and goes through the hip of the same leg.  If we extend our leg when our foot is directly below our body, this force is essentially all vertical.  Do this with enough explosion, and you will jump.  But jumping does nothing for us in terms of building speed in hockey.  It is horizontal, not vertical, motion that we need. 
 
Consider the final moments of extension (just before the leg gets fully straight during a hockey stride).  In these moments, a violent push of the skate into the ice would drive the player’s body away from that push (as was the case before).  But, since the foot is now way out to the side of the body, and since the force of such a push would go on a line from the place where the blade edge interfaces with the ice through the hip joint of the same leg, this force would drive the body not straight vertical, not straight horizontal, but a diagonal in between.
 
Now consider this same final moments of extension with greater knee bend.  The hips would be lower and this force would be directed closer to the horizontal.  Since we are looking to maximize horizontal force this is huge for our ability to achieve speed.  Within the same body, if we get in the habit of skating with deeper knee bend, we can produce the same force and yet achieve greater horizontal force.   
 
Combine the two effects of knee bend to understand its importance.
  
With greater knee bend we can increase our extension length AND improve our horizontal force production even without training the body to produce more force.  By combining those two effects we see that it is simply a huge factor in our ability to produce horizontal force and to get from place to place on the ice more quickly, efficiently, and effectively.
So far we have looked at the impact of knee bend in terms of the forward stride and horizontal force production.  In crossovers, increased extension length and horizontal force add to speed and lateral acceleration which are the goals there.  In the backward stride, increased knee bend helps us produce more rearward horizontal force.  Knee bend also helps with performance on stops, starts, and tight turns.  All of these effects of knee bend in all these areas of skating are related to one or both of the effects discussed above (increased extension length and/or flattening of the extension force).  The effects and benefits of knee bend in high tempo skating remain present regardless of what on-ice maneuver or stride technique we are attempting.  And if it wasn’t so critical in all facets of skating… well then it wouldn’t be the king.
Andy Blaylock and Competitive Edge provide hockey skill development training in a facility setting and on-ice for players of all ages and abilities.

Memorial Skate and Fundraiser

by barbaragarn

By Mike Heutmaker, JMSer

Honoring the memory of Brandi Frakie: I skate with a group of people (men and women) on Sunday mornings, primarily at St. Louis Park Ice Arena. These players have been doing this Sunday morning thing for a few years now and we’ve become a pretty tight group (hockey has a way of doing this). This is one of those skates you look forward to not only week to week, but summer to summer.

One of the more skilled players who joined us a few years ago was Brandi Frakie, a lovely young lady who was skating for Wayne State varsity hockey and the Minnesota Thoroughbreds prior to that. She was so skilled and fun to watch, and seeing her on the ice, in her element, was always entertaining. Brandi spent a lot of time at the St. Louis Park Ice Arena, both as an athlete and employee.

Last summer, we received some terribly sad news. On August 25, after completing her junior year at Wayne State, for some reason we will never understand, Brandi took her own life. I still struggle trying to understand this, and I’m sure I never will.

As a group, the Sunday morning hockey players knew we needed to do something to memorialize Brandi. The sponsor of the Sunday morning games, John Bellingham of the AHA Roadrunners, has organized a memorial skate and fundraiser in Brandi’s memory, for July 10 at the St. Louis Park Ice Arena. The event will include a family skate and hockey–full details are below.

We’d like to raise money to buy the St. Louis Park Ice Arena two Automatic Electronic Defibrillators (AEDs) in Brandi’s memory. Any funds beyond the $2,500 raised to cover the cost of these devices will go to Brandi’s family. 

I ask that if you can attend, please do. If you can’t and would like to make a donation to the cause, please see below. And if nothing else, please pass this info to anyone who might be interested. Everyone, at any level of skating ability, is welcome and encouraged to attend.

And finally, if you know anyone who may need help, or if you need assistance or just someone to talk to, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255, or visit www.SAVE.org for more help and resources.

Event: Sunday, July 10
2.30 to 4 p.m.
Kids, family, friends open skate

A donation of $30 per family would be helpful, but any donation above this amount would be greatly appreciated.
Children must be accompanied by an adult while on the ice. Helmets and protective gear are strongly recommended.

4 to 5.45 p.m.
Pick-up hockey

A donation of $25 per person would be helpful, but any donation above this amount would be greatly appreciated.

If you are unable to attend but would like to make a donation, you can make out your check to Bob and Kim Evers and send it c/o John Bellingham to 8 Westwood Circle, Minnetonka 55305.

Helmets

by barbaragarn

By Mark Chapin, JMSer and co-founder of Lifetime Hockey 

Contrary to some manufacturer’s statements, no hockey helmet has been proven to prevent brain concussions. The primary purpose of the helmet is to prevent skull fractures when you fall. 

According to Charles Pink, store manager at the Hockey Giant in Bloomington, “The best way to help reduce injuries is to get a properly fitting helmet.” Scott Fuerstenberg, who manages Dave’s Sports Shop in Fridley, says “With the right fit, there should be no wiggle when you shake your head.”

 

Many of the mid-priced helmets have comfortable padding and will provide adequate head protection. However, some of the low-end helmets (like the Easton S7 and S9, Vector 04-08, Bauer 1500, 4500, and 5100) use vinyl nitrate and dual-density foams that will harden over time after contact with perspiration acids. Because the foam hardens as it is repeatedly exposed to sweat acids, the helmet foam does not provide the same level of protection as when it was new. For this reason, a low-end helmet should be replaced ever few years.

 

Pink notes that most high end helmets use EPP foam combined with a softer, gel-like foam that does not harden over time. Some examples of high-end helmets include the Reebok 6K and 8K (soon to be replaced by the 7K and 11K), Bauer 7500 and 9900, CCM Vector 10, Easton S13, S17 and S19.

 

I really like the new M11, manufactured by Cascade Sports. It has a nice fit and it looks pretty good, too. This helmet is the product of a project led by NHL legend Mark Messier to design a better hockey helmet. Check out this review and the comments about the M11’s level of protection.

 

The M11 (Messier wore number 11 on his jersey) has a one-piece shell with a thumb ratchet adjustment on the back of the helmet near the neckline. The M11 comes in small, medium and large. It’s more expensive than some helmets; the price at Dave’s Sports Shop and at Hockey Giant is $119.99.

 

So take a look your helmet and its fit. Does it slide around when you shake your head? Does it pinch your head and cause pain and headaches? Is it a low-end helmet that you have had for a couple of years, or was it used when you bought it? Maybe it is time to replace your helmet. 

Face Protection Discussion

by barbaragarn

​I got this e-mail from a JMSer and I thought I would post it (anonymously) and generate some discussion. 

I strongly feel that all players should use face protection–especially Levels 1-3. You may think your reaction time is great, but you never know what kooky stuff will happen on the ice. Is it worth your teeth? I have seen some nasty stuff on the ice.

Here’s the e-mail:

In the short time I have been playing JMS games, I have noticed people getting injured because they don’t wear face protection. Most recently at the level 3 game I played in Richfield Friday. A collision that would have been no big deal turned into a bloody mouth and possibly dental work (I am not sure because the hurt player was not on my bench). 

The week before someone played with wire rim glasses (which I also wear) and no cage or visor. I thought, has he ever seen the damage even a minor blow to the corner of those eyeglass frames can do to the bridge of the nose and eye socket? I have and it is not pretty. 

I always wear a cage because it just makes sense to me. I don’t want to leave the rink hurt or feel bad because someone else didn’t wear protection. It is a rough game and things happen and we all know that going in, yet it seems these types of injuries are easily preventable with proper equipment. It is kind of like seat belts or motorcycle helmets, some people just don’t want them. 

I understand the freedom of choice. I know JMS can’t force things on people and shouldn’t. As the shoulder pad debate last week proved, everyone has their own take on it. I am not about to tell anyone what to do. I thought maybe it could be brought up for discussion on your chat forum and maybe some people would think twice about it. I hate to see people get hurt when you know it was avoidable.

Skills Improvement from Clinics

by barbaragarn

By Mark Chapin and Dan McLaughlin, Lifetime Hockey

We are obviously biased in promoting Lifetime Hockey’s annual Adult Hockey Camp. Regardless of that, we encourage you to take a clinic and try other hockey schools. The only way you are going to improve as a player is to participate in a camp or a clinic. 

Playing JMS and/or league hockey is fun, but it is challenging to improve one’s skill level quickly in a game-only environment. The learning curve is long and slow without good coaching.  Sometimes it can actually hurt player development, to continue our bad habits and actually reinforce them. Working with a good coach is the only way to receive unbiased, targeted and knowledgeable feedback. 

When considering a hockey school or clinic, check out the credentials of the coaches. Do they have experience in coaching adults? It is different with adult learners. How many instructors are on the ice at one time? Are there youth players who are coaching? Are there opportunities to work on your skills in a dryland setting? Is there classroom instruction? What is the coach to student ratio? How many players are on the ice at one time? What do past participants have to say about the school?

Consider attending Lifetime Hockey’s Summer Camp, July 20-23, at Parade Ice Garden in Minneapolis. Tom Bast is returning with his Canadian coaching staff. Lifetime Hockey offers the opportunity to make a partial payment to reserve a spot in camp, which expires on Monday, May 2, 2011.  A special team discount (bring 5 or more players) is available until June 1, 2011.

Announcing Morning Hockey

by barbaragarn

Yes! Starting April 27, JMS will hold a morning hockey game at Breck Anderson Arena in Golden Valley.

The games will be an hour (6:15 to 7:15 a.m.) and the facility has excellent, new clean showers–one side for the women and one side for the men. The location is great for access to downtown: you can play hockey and still get to work by 8 a.m. — and feeling better, more invigorated and awake than probably ever before.

Since the game is just an hour, I’ve limited it to only 18 skaters. It’s a Community Session so we will have the largest possible skater and goalie pool from which to draw players.

Make sure to pack breakfast because you will be ready to eat afterwards (alas, no cheesy hash browns provided, my apres a.m. hockey choice). Morning hockey! You have to really try it to understand its allure.

Here is the link to sign up: http://www.jmshockey.com/games/2761

Hope you can make it!

The Shot That Scores

by barbaragarn

​Guest blog by Dan Mclaughlin of Lifetime Hockey

Why You’ll Love the Snap Shot–Making the Shot That Scores

Normal
0

false
false
false

EN-US
X-NONE
X-NONE


<w:LatentStyles DefLockedState="false" DefUnhideWhenUsed="true"
DefSemiHidden=”true” DefQFormat=”false” DefPriority=”99″
LatentStyleCount=”267″>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="0" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”Normal”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="9" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”heading 1″/>

<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="10" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”Title”/>

<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="11" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”Subtitle”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="22" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”Strong”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="20" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”Emphasis”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="59" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Table Grid”/>

<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="1" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”No Spacing”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Shading”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light List”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Grid”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Dark List”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Shading”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful List”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Grid”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Shading Accent 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light List Accent 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Grid Accent 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 1 Accent 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 2 Accent 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 1 Accent 1″/>

<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="34" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”List Paragraph”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="29" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”Quote”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="30" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”Intense Quote”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 2 Accent 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 1 Accent 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 2 Accent 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 3 Accent 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Dark List Accent 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Shading Accent 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful List Accent 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Grid Accent 1″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Shading Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light List Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Grid Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 1 Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 2 Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 1 Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 2 Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 1 Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 2 Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 3 Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Dark List Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Shading Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful List Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Grid Accent 2″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Shading Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light List Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Grid Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 1 Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 2 Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 1 Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 2 Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 1 Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 2 Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 3 Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Dark List Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Shading Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful List Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Grid Accent 3″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Shading Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light List Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Grid Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 1 Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 2 Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 1 Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 2 Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 1 Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 2 Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 3 Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Dark List Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Shading Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful List Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Grid Accent 4″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Shading Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light List Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Grid Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 1 Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 2 Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 1 Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 2 Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 1 Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 2 Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 3 Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Dark List Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Shading Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful List Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Grid Accent 5″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="60" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Shading Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="61" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light List Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="62" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Light Grid Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="63" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 1 Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="64" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Shading 2 Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="65" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 1 Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="66" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium List 2 Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="67" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 1 Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="68" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 2 Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="69" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Medium Grid 3 Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="70" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Dark List Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="71" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Shading Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="72" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful List Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="73" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” Name=”Colorful Grid Accent 6″/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="19" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”Subtle Emphasis”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="21" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”Intense Emphasis”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="31" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”Subtle Reference”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="32" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”Intense Reference”/>
<w:LsdException Locked="false" Priority="33" SemiHidden="false"
UnhideWhenUsed=”false” QFormat=”true” Name=”Book Title”/>

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-parent:””;
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
font-family:”Times New Roman”,”serif”;}

A hockey team will get about 30
to 40 shots on net in a game. This
means the average player will only get between 2 to 5 shots on net–so every shot should be a good
one.  The beginning and
intermediate player needs to remember that t
he three keys to a scoring
shot are: quickness, accuracy
and speed.

Good
goalies watch the puck carefully and set up to take each shot. If you shoot quickly, before the goalie
gets set, your chance of scoring improves immeasurably. A quick shot is one that comes quickly off a
pass, a rebound or a scramble in front of the net. Many players have a tendency to hold
the puck on their stick too long in order to get ready to make a “really good
shot.” This extra time is
all a goalie needs to set up to make the save, or have a defensive player block it. Even marginal
shots should be made quickly. As
Wayne Gretsky has said, “the shot not taken will not score 100% of the time.”

A key to
increasing scoring productivity is to make the goalie move. Players should always be aware of the goalie’s position and try to shoot if they see the goalie move. Discipline yourself to pass
to a teammate rather than shooting if this
causes the goalie to move across the
crease. Your teammate
will then have a much better shot.

There are
four primary types of shots: wrist shot, snap shot, slap shot and backhand. You
should be able to use them all and should not rely on just one or two. However, the slap shot should be left at home
if you are playing adult recreational hockey such as JMS because it is the
least accurate shot–and the one most
likely to injure a player. By contrast, our coaches at the
Lifetime
Hockey School

emphasize the snap shot because this is the way m
ost goals are scored today in college and pro hockey.

The snap
shot is a shorter version of the wrist shot and is used when you are close to
the goal (below the face-off dot.)  It
has the advantage of a quick release, and
by keeping the puck on your stick until the last moment it can surprise a
goalie. It is also a good
shot to use when skating at top speed and maneuvering in front of the net.
Watch the next breakaway goal from a good hockey player and you will see either
the deke or the snapshot as their preferred scoring approach.

The
snap shot is begun by drawing the puck to your side, but it is not drawn back
as in the forehand shot. You next need to cock your wrist and bring your
arms forward, snap your wrists and follow through.  The snap shot is dependent on your
wrists and arms and does not always require that you shift your weight as you
shoot. 
Here
is a good demonstration
of the mechanics of the
snap shot and this video really focuses
on moving the puck before snapping
off the shot.

The next time you are warming up
before a game, take a few pucks aside and practice your snap shot against the
boards. If you can imprint the snap shot
on your muscle memory, you will be surprised how you will improve your scoring.


New Session Types Announced

by barbaragarn

We are always trying to branch out here at JMS and are excited to announce two new offerings. These new sessions continue the JMS tradition of leading pick-up hockey innovation.

Extreme Parity Session
Tired of teams not being exactly even? This is the session for you.
Preregistration

  • Skaters will sign up in offsetting tandem–ie, Level 1 paired with Level 5, Level 2 with Level 4. Level 3s will sign up together.
  • Each skater will be weighed and measured to ensure teams are exactly even in size (weigh-in will be at the rink the night before).
  • Each skater will also be assigned a jersey bar code for better identification and tracking.

Warm-Up

  • The captain will lead the players in a series of on-ice group warm-up calisthenics. Players will then move to their pre-assigned teams.

The Game

  • Each player may carry the puck for 30 seconds, and then must pass. We will have someone in the scorekeeper’s box to sound the horn every 30 seconds, all 90 minutes of the game, to ensure proper timing on the passing rule. (We are now soliciting volunteers to track and sound the horn.)
  • Each player must score one goal per game. Play will continue until each player has scored at least one goal. (We will book extra ice time for these games, as they may go long. Please plan your babysitter accordingly.)
  • Each team must score the same number of points. Teams will trade off scoring opportunities (ie, if Dark scores first, then White must score, and only then will it be Dark’s turn to score again).

We feel the above careful and managed system will guarantee a perfect, 100% balanced game.

For those craving less organization, we are happy to announce the Thunderdome Sessions.
“Rules are… there are no rules.” (on ice, anyway)
Preregistration

  • Each player must present proof of health insurance and have an emergency contact on file on their account (under “Profile”)–and we strongly prefer each participant let us know blood type and bring a personal EMT to the rink on standby

Warm-Up

  • No warm-up.

The Game

  • No rules of any kind–ice the puck at will, hack the goalie after it’s covered, camp out offsides, whatever you like. 
  • And no penalties! The game will not stop for broken bones or bloodshed; injured players must conduct themselves to the bench the best they can.
  • However, if a player remains prone on the ice for 10 minutes, we will send a special medical team to investigate–but only if the play is at the other end (we will not stop the game just to retrieve an unconscious skater).

We hope you enjoy these new offerings from JMS Hockey and that you have a happy April Fool’s Day–

Merging Skills and Knowledge

by barbaragarn

​Guest blog by Reid Sellgren

In golf, you must constantly be alert of your surroundings–not only to duck when someone yells, “Fore!” to avoid adding a third eye, but to make sure that you aren’t standing in a fellow golfer’s line, or that you’re standing still when someone else is putting, or that you’re quiet during the other golfers’ backswing. Most golfers know exactly what I just said, but for newer golfers, it may not be so clear.

Like golf, as a newer hockey player, you aren’t expected to have mastered the skills and knowledge, but being alert to your surroundings can get you there quicker– and experienced skaters are far from being immune themselves.

Over the last two years, I’ve skated Level 4 and 5 and Community Sessions and I have learned ways to work on my game at any level. Skating next to a player who just picked up the game a few years earlier and can already hang with Level 4s, or completing a pass to a Level 1 skater and watching them slam home a goal, gives me all the reasons I need to keep coming back.

I know Barbara and the fine captain staff have been great at encouraging players to keep shots down in traffic, play hard but nice and take SHORT SHIFTS but I’d like to reference back to my golf scenario as it relates to playing hockey positions. Calling out your position is great, but it doesn’t require you have to stay there during your entire shift.

  • Positions — When you take the ice, you should already know what to do: mind the gap, fill the hole, whatever you want to call it. Don’t skate right to your assigned position and stand waiting for a pass if there is a 3 on 1 rush happening in your zone–fill the hole by taking the missing defender’s position (likewise for offense).
  • Rotation — You’ve heard of “cycling,” which is moving the puck through the offensive zone while working toward opening up a player for a shot on net. The puck is moving, the players are moving… and if you aren’t moving, you aren’t helping. If you’re standing high in the slot, flat skated with your stick in the air or pretending you’re Gretzky behind the net, you aren’t using your knowledge to be part of the play. Move to the puck, move to an open spot, be part of the momentum.
  • Covering — Sometimes as part of cycling or filling a hole, a defender will penetrate the offensive zone (or carry the puck from your zone)… Always be counting. If you see four players, look behind you for an empty D position and get your butt back there. Likewise for the defender, realize you’ve changed positions and either hustle back and communicate another switch or keep driving hard at whatever you were doing.

You may not yet have the skills, but playing with more knowledge will help get you there faster and make it more fun.

[BG note: This blog has useful information for upper level skaters, but I wanted to note here that Level 1s and 2s aren’t expected to have all this stuff down. Try, but don’t beat yourself up if you miss something. There’s a lot to learn, and like Reid says, even lifelong players are still honing their game. Don’t stress if you flub something; everybody does. The key is learning from it.]